The future has already been

This line of research is a study of trends in contemporary thinking about science and technology in controversial relation to culture and history. The pieces seek to represent improbable connections between what we have inherited from the past and uncertain predictions about the future that overlap in an ironic and critical play with the contraction of space and time in which the linear notion of history disappears and narratives emerge about the failure of social models and the unforeseeable consequences of unsustainable progress, all observed from a continuous and simultaneous present of de-realisation (according to Virilio’s definition) in which the virtual world is engulfing us.

Traces, remains, signs and vestiges of meaningful items from cultural history and of the concerns and fears that we are projecting forwards, like rare and precious daguerreotypes, the incunabula out of which all of our visual culture was born, appear like ancient archaeological discoveries where disturbing extra-terrestrial figures and mysterious futuristic yet already dated technologies are portrayed, along with images of electronic screen failures that have become signals of threatening presences from other worlds, the ancient psychiatric literature of being from an already mutated humanity, and maps of (dis)orientation where time and space are linked in the form of undulating flows.


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The future has already been



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